close-the-gap

Although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people comprise only about 3 per cent of the Australian population, they make up 28 per cent of the total prison population. This is an imprisonment rate 14 times higher than the non-Indigenous rate. Aboriginal people continue to die in custody – 270 people since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Report (1991). Growing prison populations mean increased costs for taxpayers without breaking the cycle of offending. The system is not working to prevent crime and is not sustainable[1].The Australian Law Reform Commission Aboriginal Customary Law Report (1986) investigated Aboriginal customary laws and any basis for their recognition in the common law. The ALRC recommended that Aboriginal customary law should be recognized, in appropriate ways, by the Australian legal system, and that the recognition of such laws must occur within the framework of the general law[2]. While both the Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Report and the Aboriginal Customary Law Report advocated in favour of upholding the rights, both traditional and modern, of Indigenous Australians, neither reports’ recommendations have been properly administered or implemented so as to fully address the issue of Indigenous disadvantage. Therefore, almost thirty years after these expensively produced reports were completed, successive Australian governments have continued to fail the Indigenous population on whose country this nation was founded.

This travesty of justice continues to beleaguer courts across Australia, with judges having to make complex decisions using the only legislative tool available the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth). This leads to arbitrary decision making that in turn leads to expensive appeals processes in order to ascertain the correct form of justice available. An example of this is Walker v NSW (1994) 182 CLR 45, where the High Court considered whether customary law has an application in criminal law where there is no legislative basis. Mason CJ referenced the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 to declare:

It is a basic principle that all people should stand equal before the law. A construction which results in different criminal sanctions applying to different persons for the same conduct offends that basic principle (See Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth), s.10)…And just as all persons in the country enjoy the benefits of domestic laws from which they are not expressly excluded, so also must they accept the burdens those laws impose[3].

It is this reference to the Racial Discrimination Act which is telling in Mason CJ’s ruling, as Part 1, Article 1.4 of the Schedule to that Act, being the international source of the Act itself, “The International Convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination” plainly states:

Special measures taken for the sole purpose of securing adequate advancement of certain racial or ethnic groups or individuals requiring such protection as may be necessary in order to ensure such groups or individuals equal enjoyment or exercise of human rights and fundamental freedoms shall not be deemed racial discrimination, provided, however, that such measures do not, as a consequence, lead to the maintenance of separate rights for different racial groups and that they shall not be continued after the objectives for which they were taken have been achieved[4].

The Convention’s intent is to not just seek equality for all humans but also to enact equity for those who have suffered discrimination, and it is this UN Article that alludes to this intent. Special measures are needed in order to apply justice with an even hand. However, should this mean that customary law should be applied over criminal law in Australian courts? I will argue that, while the recognition of customary law may make the implementation of the law seem arbitrary, the recognition of socially reinforced disadvantage, particularly Indigenous disadvantage, is important to prevent the law being applied arbitrarily.

In the early 1990s the High Court upheld the native title rights of Indigenous Australians and the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) was born. At about the same time Mason CJ declared that customary law had no place in Australian law and the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (RCIADC) released its recommendations. The cause of the Royal Commission was the intolerable amount of Indigenous people who had died in police custody in the preceding years. It is with interest that one can regard the recommendations of the RCIADC to ascertain almost three decades later whether processes have changed and what has worked.  With regard to the legal system, the Commission made many conclusions which have been completely ignored, especially by state governments. Some nineteen of these recommendations were:

That Police Services take all possible steps to eliminate:Violent or rough treatment or verbal abuse of Aboriginal persons, including women and young people, by police officers; and the use of racist or offensive language, or the use of racist or derogatory comments in log books and other documents, by police officers. When such conduct is found to have occurred, it should be treated as a serious breach of discipline. (2:223)

That all Police Services review their use of para-military forces such as the New South Wales SWOS and TRG units to ensure that there is no avoidable use of such units in circumstances affecting Aboriginal communities. (2:223)

That governments and Aboriginal organisations recognise that the problems affecting Aboriginal juveniles are so widespread and have such potentially disastrous repercussions for the future that there is an urgent need for governments and Aboriginal organisations to negotiate together to devise strategies designed to reduce the rate at which Aboriginal juveniles are involved in the welfare and criminal justice systems and, in particular, to reduce the rate at which Aboriginal juveniles are separated from their families and communities, whether by being declared to be in need of care, detained, imprisoned or otherwise. (2:252)

That police services should monitor the effect of legislation which decriminalises drunkenness with a view to ensuring that people detained by police officers are not being detained in police cells when they should more appropriately have been taken to alternative places of care. The effect of such legislation should be monitored to ensure that persons who would otherwise have been apprehended for drunkenness are not, instead, being arrested and charged with other minor offences. Such monitoring should also assess differences in police practices between urban and rural areas. The results of such monitoring of the implementation of the decriminalisation of drunkenness should be made public. (3:29)

The use of offensive language in circumstances of interventions initiated by police should not normally be occasion for arrest or charge. Police services should examine and monitor the use of offensive language charges. (3:29)

That all police services should adopt and apply the principle of arrest being the sanction of last resort in dealing with offenders. Police administrators should train and instruct police officers accordingly and should closely check that this principle is carried out in practice. Administrators of police services should take a more active role in ensuring police compliance with directives, guidelines and rules aimed at reducing unnecessary custodies and should review practices and procedures relevant to the use of arrest or process by summons and in particular should take account of the following matters. That all possible steps should be taken to ensure that allowances paid to police officers do not operate as an incentive to increase the number of arrests. That a statistical data base should be established for monitoring the use of summons and arrest procedures on a Statewide basis noting the utilisation of such procedures, in particular divisions and stations. Also, the role of supervisors should be examined and, where necessary, strengthened to provide for the overseeing of the appropriateness of arrest practices by police officers. That efficiency and promotion criteria should be reviewed to ensure that advantage does not accrue to individuals or to police stations as a result of the frequency of making charges or arrests. That procedures should be reviewed to ensure that work processes (particularly relating to paper work) are not encouraging arrest rather than the adoption of other options such as proceeding by summons or caution. That governments, in conjunction with police services, should consider the question of whether procedures for formal caution should be established in respect of certain types of offences rather than proceeding by way of prosecution. (3:42).

That in jurisdictions where motor vehicle offences are a significant cause of Aboriginal imprisonment the factors relevant to such incidence be identified, and, in conjunction with Aboriginal community organisations, programs be designed to reduce that incidence of offending. (3:71)

 That legislation in all jurisdictions should provide that where an Aboriginal defendant appears before a Court and there is doubt as to whether the person has the ability to fully understand proceedings in the English language and is fully able to express himself or herself in the English language, the court be obliged to satisfy itself that the person has that ability. Where there is doubt or reservations as to these matters proceedings should not continue until a competent interpreter is provided to the person without cost to that person. (3:79)

That, in the first instance, proceedings for a breach of a non- custodial order should ordinarily be commenced by summons or attendance notice and not by arrest of the offender. (3:80)

That it be recognised by Aboriginal Legal Services, funding authorities and courts that lawyers cannot adequately represent clients unless they have adequate time to take instructions and prepare cases, and that this is a special problem in communities without access to lawyers other than at the time of court hearings. (3:91)

 That State and Territory Governments examine the range of non-custodial sentencing options available in each jurisdiction with a view to ensuring that an appropriate range of such options is available. (3:96)

 That adequate resources be made available to provide support by way of personnel and infrastructure so as to ensure that non-custodial sentencing options which are made available by legislation are capable of implementation in practice. It is particularly important that such support be provided in rural and remote areas of significant Aboriginal population. (3:96)

 That Corrective Services authorities ensure that Aboriginal offenders are not being denied opportunities for probation and parole by virtue of the lack of adequate numbers of trained support staff or of infrastructure to ensure monitoring of such orders. (3:117)

That governments consider introducing an ongoing amnesty on the execution of long outstanding warrants of commitment for unpaid fines. (3:126)

Where legislation does not already so provide governments should ensure that sentences of imprisonment are not automatically imposed in default of payment of a fine. Such legislation should provide alternative sanctions and impose a statutory duty upon sentencers to consider a defendant’s capacity to pay in assessing the appropriate monetary penalty and time to pay, by instalments or otherwise. (3:126)

That the Department of Education, Employment and Training be responsible for the development of a comprehensive national strategy designed to improve the opportunities for the education and training of those in custody. This should be done in co- operation with state Corrective Services authorities, adult education providers (including in particular independent Aboriginal-controlled providers) and State departments of employment and education. The aim of the strategy should be to extend the aims of the Aboriginal Education Policy and the Aboriginal Employment Development Policy to Aboriginal prisoners, and to develop suitable mechanisms for the delivery of education and training programs to prisoners (3:353).

 That prisoners, including Aboriginal prisoners, should receive remuneration for work performed. In order to encourage Aboriginal prisoners to overcome the educational disadvantage, which most Aboriginal people presently suffer, Aboriginal prisoners who pursue education or training courses during the hours when other prisoners are involved in remunerated work should receive the same level of remuneration. (This recommendation is not intended to apply to study undertaken outside the normal hours of work of prisoners.) (3:357)

That police administrators give police officers greater encouragement to proceed by way of caution rather than by arrest, summons or attendance notice. That wherever possible the police caution be given in the presence of a parent, adult relative or person having care and responsibility for the juvenile. Also, that if a police caution is given other than in the presence of any such person having care and responsibility for the juvenile such person be notified in writing of the fact and details of the caution administered. (4:184)

 That where an Aboriginal juvenile is taken to a police station for interrogation or as a result of arrest, the officer in charge of the police station at which the juvenile is detained should be required to immediately advise the relevant Aboriginal Legal Service and the parent or person responsible for the care and supervision of the juvenile of the fact of the child being detained at the police station (without prejudice to any obligation to advise any other person). (4:203)

That no Aboriginal juvenile should be interrogated by a police officer except in the presence of a parent, other person responsible for the care and supervision of the child or, in the absence of a parent or such other person, an officer of an agency or organisation charged with responsibility for the care and welfare of Aboriginal juveniles. (4:203)

 That legislation, regulations and/or police standing orders, as may be appropriate, be amended so as to require compliance with the above recommendations. (4:205)

According to the Human Rights Commission both state and federal governments have done little to implement the Royal Commission’s recommendations and, due to this, the percentage of Indigenous people incarcerated in Australian prisons has increased exponentially in proportion to the rest of the population[5]. It would seem that the recommendations would have done much to assist the intention to prevent this increase and yet many governments, such as the Northern Territory’s administration, have actually brought in more pernicious laws such as mandatory detention which have exacerbated the problem. Mandatory detention takes the responsibility of a judge to determine justice and puts it in the hands of politicians trying to gain popularity with a majority. This, in itself, is fundamentally against the intentions and objectives of the “International Convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination”, has had an overwhelming negative effect on Indigenous people, and is a serious indictment on Australia’s performance as an international actor.

Just after the RCIADC, the Supreme Court of NSW had sought to implement the objectives of the UN Convention in R v Fernando (1992) 76 a crim r 58 and try and to address these problems judicially. The Fernando principles underpinned a direction in sentencing that framed jurisprudence on the relevance of Aboriginality, alcoholism and disadvantage. The principles provided for lighter sentences that reflected the Indigenous offender’s reduced moral culpability and promote non-custodial sentences in light of over-representation in the prison system. However, it could be argued that only having a judicial approach to social justice reinforces stereotypes and that it is only through structural reform within the larger society, as set out in the Royal Commission’s findings, that a more genuine sense of justice can be achieved.

Advances in neuroscience have led criminologists to assert that offender autonomy is an assumption based upon a fallacy of free will[6]. As the political philosopher John Rawls claimed, we are not in control of the situation to which we are born and therefore being born into strong social disadvantage is something that is difficult to overcome[7]. It relies upon the availability of opportunity and societal good will. This is reflected in the Convention and has led courts to be more lenient of disadvantaged offenders to redistribute their burdens. When courts fail to consider such inequalities the disadvantaged are given sentences disproportionate to their culpability. Widening social inequalities also limit offenders’ choices and so justice would also demand that society acknowledge responsibility for such economic hardship and assist the offender in sentencing. This last assertion should also require that society be active in alleviating hardship and suffering within the community and address political policy and legislation towards this purpose. Further programs of rehabilitation and reintegration in lieu of imprisonment could reform and improve the position of the offender.

While the principles in Fernando continue to be advocated on behalf of Indigenous defendants, Australian courts since the late 1990s have confined who can be classed as Indigenous for the purposes of applying those principles. Increasingly in court decisions, it regards the identity and community ties of Indigenous offenders as being washed away by time and urbanization.  This results in further discrimination as to deciphering what is being ‘Aboriginal enough’, and considering  all remote Indigenous communities as being dysfunctional and in need of activating the Fernando principles. Therefore, while harsher penalties are meted out to those that are considered to have been re-advantaged through time, the arbitrariness in the way the Fernando principles are enacted and the judicial view of the Indigenous community is managed impels a rethink of how social justice can be better achieved through transformative techniques. To continue to rely upon judicial or political magnanimity and mercy is relying upon the whims of the Anglo-Australian legal order, thereby reinforcing discrimination and continuing the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in prisons.

The Australian Law Reform Commission in its report on Aboriginal Customary Laws[8] found that judicial recognition did not project Aboriginal community concerns, and that a greater degree of local control over community-identified crime problems would be more effective. It is a pluralist strategy that responds to the circumstances of the individual Indigenous community. Where Indigenous laws bind communities the processes directed to punishment can be a legitimate method for mediation and resolution between victims, perpetrators and the rest of the community. An example of this is the acceptance of the Warlpiri Elders who conveyed their acceptance of Anglo-Australian court processes, so long as ‘traditional’ punishment can be carried out to reconcile their community[9].

 

When social justice is considered by the wider community to be applied simply through more lenient sentencing for Indigenous offenders this only reinforces the white racial illusion which presents itself as tolerant and understanding but is merely a means of controlling an Indigenous population. This type of affirmative action is prone to disintegrate in the face of other norms such as courts falling back on the position that Indigenous offenders are to be treated equally to other offenders through refusal to recognize Indigeneity. There is also the further injustice and institutional subordination of determining Indigenous communities as dysfunctional in order to aggravate sentences and condemn the community. Recently, the High Court addressed the issue of the whether courts should take into account unique circumstances of Aboriginal offenders and the high rate of incarceration of Aboriginal Australians when sentencing Aboriginal offenders in Bugmy v The Queen [2013] HCA 37.

In Bugmy, French CJ, Hayne, Crennan, Kiefel, Bell and Keane JJ. expressed that a deprived background may mitigate a sentence for an Indigenous offender in the same way that it does for a non-Indigenous offender. They quoted Simpson J who in Fernando explained the significance of the statements in Fernando:

“Properly understood, Fernando is a decision, not about sentencing Aboriginals, but about the recognition, in sentencing decisions, of social disadvantage that frequently (no matter what the ethnicity of the offender) precedes the commission of crime.”

 In concluding, the High Court held that the same sentencing principles apply irrespective of the identity of a particular offender or his or her membership of an ethnic or other group. Additionally, the joint reasons held that the effects upon an offender of profound deprivation do not diminish over time and should be given full weight when sentencing the offender. However, the judgment also went on to declare that those effects do not necessarily serve to mitigate an offender’s sentence given the conflicting purposes of punishment, such as rehabilitation and personal and general deterrence, which must be balanced in each individual case.

Even taking into account the High Court decision in Bugmy to renew the principles in Fernando, this approach to convicting and sentencing Indigenous people still leaves the situation where the incarceration rates will keep increasing, and does not address the issues and recommendations of the RCIADC. Alcohol is not just an issue in Indigenous communities anymore, methamphetamine and petrol sniffing is also causing a scourge of destruction and damage. The increase in youth suicides in some communities is substantial which leaves the necessity to implement policies that reflect those recommendations as an imperative.

Currently, state and federal governments must address transparently their goals of reducing the health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in a bipartisan program called Close the Gap[10]. Yet it seems another program to be at the mercy of competing political ideologies, as were the other costly reports and recommendations that failed to be translated into legislation and dependent upon the budget allocations of successive changing government administrations. A consultative approach to Indigenous affairs is one of the main bridges to achieving these goals, as was pointed out in the Royal Commission’s findings. Therefore, while it is good that the High Court has again implemented the principles of sentencing by Wood J in Fernando, such an approach is ad hoc and needs the Australian community to commit to instigating social programs that are not politically ideological but those that have been recommended by Indigenous groups, are known to work and are protected by legislation that adheres to the objectives of the “The International Convention on the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination”.

 

[1] http://antar.org.au/campaigns/justice-campaign

[2]http://www.alrc.gov.au/publications/Recognition%20of%20Aboriginal%20Customary%20Laws%20%28ALRC%20Report%2031%29/37-summary-recommendations

[3] Walker v NSW (1994) 182 CLR 45

 

[4] http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/rda1975202/

[5] https://www.humanrights.gov.au/publications/indigenous-deaths-custody-report-summary

[6] Green and Cohen, (2004), For the law, neuroscience changes nothing and everything, Princeton University, Princeton

[7] Rawls, J. 1972, ‘An Egalitarian Theory of Justice’, extracts from A Theory of Justice, reprinted in Tom Beauchamp & Norman Bowie (eds.). Ethical Theory and Business, 6th edition, (Prentice Hall, 2001)

[8] http://www.alrc.gov.au/publications/report-31

[9] Anthony, Thalia. Is there social justice in sentencing indigenous offenders [online]. University of New South Wales Law Journal, The, Vol. 35, No. 2, 2012 563-59

[10] http://www.naccho.org.au/aboriginal-health/close-the-gap-campaign

Above image: https://nacchocommunique.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/close-the-gap.jpg

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